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Psychologists Test Kant’s Aesthetics

The experience of beauty is a pleasure, but common sense and philosophy suggest that feeling beauty differs from sensuous pleasures such as eating or sex. Immanuel Kant claimed that experiencing beauty requires thought but that sensuous pleasure can be enjoyed without thought and cannot be beautiful. These venerable hypotheses persist in models of aesthetic processing but have never been tested.

Until now.

Denis Pelli, a psychologist at New York University, and Aenne Brielmann, a psychology graduate student who works in Pelli’s lab (and whose interesting-sounding PhD work is on “empirical aesthetics”), have run a series of experiments testing Kant’s hypoetheses. Their results, published in Current Biology, are, in sum:

We confirm Kant’s claim that only the pleasure associated with feeling beauty requires thought and disprove his claim that sensuous pleasures cannot be beautiful.

Science Daily has a helpful description of what the Pelli and Brielmann did:

To explore these philosophical theories in the new study, Pelli and Aenne Brielmann asked 62 people to indicate how much pleasure and beauty they felt while they saw an image, tasted a candy, or touched a soft teddy bear. The researchers showed each person many different images, some beautiful, some merely nice, and others neutral, like a chair in a furniture catalog. Participants then rated their experience of each object on a four-point beauty scale.

In another round of the same experiment, participants were asked to repeat what they’d done earlier, this time while they were distracted with a secondary task. In that task, participants heard a series of letters and were asked to press a button any time they heard the same letter they’d heard two letters before.

The researchers found that the experience of non-beautiful objects wasn’t changed by the distraction. But, distraction took away from the experience of beauty when a person was shown an image earlier deemed beautiful. In other words, Kant was right. Beauty does require thought.

However, contrary to Kant’s proposal that sensual pleasures can never be beautiful, about 30 percent of participants said they’d definitely experienced beauty after sucking on a candy or touching a soft teddy bear.

Surprised by that, the researchers decided to follow up. They asked some participants who had responded “definitely yes” for beauty on candy trials what they’d meant. As Brielmann and Pelli report, “most of them remarked that sucking candy had personal meaning for them, like a fond childhood memory. One participant replied, ‘Of course, anything can be beautiful.’”

“Our findings show that many other things besides art can be beautiful—even candy,” Brielmann says. “But for maximum pleasure, nothing beats undistracted beauty.”

So, philosophers, does this research show what Pelli and Brielmann thinks it shows?

Figure 1 (detail), “Beauty Requires Thought” by Brielmann & Pelli, 2017

The post Psychologists Test Kant’s Aesthetics appeared first on Daily Nous.

Full article:Psychologists Test Kant’s Aesthetics

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